Bioanalysis Zone

The use of blood microsampling for the quantitative bioanalysis of pharmaceuticals in early development

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Microsampling is a technique that permits the collection of reduced volumes of sample matrix (typically blood or plasma), thereby reducing the number of animals required on a study, yet allowing you to still accurately determine concentrations of dosed drugs or endogenous analytes with reduced data complexity.

Blood microsampling is a technique that permits the collection of reduced volumes of sample for the determination of circulating blood concentrations of dosed drugs or endogenous analytes such as biomarkers. For early drug development studies, the primary benefit of microsampling is to reduce the number of animals required on a study. This is because more time points can be taken from a single animal, rather than using satellite animals in order to collect sufficient blood volume using normal techniques. By reducing the necessary blood volume to a level where all parameters can be measured from the main study animals, the complexity of data interpretation is reduced (e.g., serial sampling vs composite pharmacokinetic profiles). Nonetheless, there are technical challenges to overcome, not least of which is the quantitative collection and separation of blood samples with volumes as little as 20 μl.

Speaker:

Hayes Roger 10460ret-a gilroy

 

 

 

 

Roger Hayes
Vice President and General Manager, Laboratory Sciences
MPI Research

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