Bioanalysis Zone

Robert MacNeill: Various discourses in excellent method performance

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Below you can find links and information on the quarterly column by Robert MacNeill (Covance), which focuses on quantitative method design.

1. ‘A discourse on sample preparation – Part 1‘ – In this first instalment of Robert’s quarterly column, Robert discusses the importance of SPE and details his surprise at the notion held by some that SPE may become obsolete.

2. ‘A discourse on sample preparation – Part 2‘ – In this article Robert discusses the alternatives to SPE for quantitative bioanalysis.

3. ‘A discourse in method robustness – orthogonality of selectivity within a bioanalytical method‘ – In this instalment Robert discusses orthogonal selectivity, providing an ironic example of how one assay’s performance was improved by making the selectivity of the SPE closely analogous to the subsequent chromatography.

4. Ruminations on silica-based and organic polymer-based bioanalytical SPE – In this instalment of Robert MacNeill’s column, Robert delves into the SPE domain providing an endorsement of silica-based SPE.

5. How analogous can solid-phase extraction and analytical liquid chromatography be? – In this instalment of Robert MacNeill’s column, Robert poses the question: How analogous can solid-phase extraction and analytical liquid chromatography be?

6. Solid-phase extraction: a principal option for peptide bioanalytical sample preparation – In this instalment of Robert MacNeill’s column, Robert proposes the possibility of using solid-phase extraction for peptide sample preparation accommodating the polar and charged nature associated with peptides.

7. The case for HILIC-SPE – In this instalment of Robert MacNeill’s column, Robert makes a case for endeavoring to incorporate orthogonal selectivity in a method even if it means exploring what might be viewed as unorthodox, as long as it’s scientifically sound and ultimately proven with adequate rigor.

8. The specifics of control matrices: How far to go? – In this instalment of Robert MacNeill’s column, Robert gives his thoughts about some pertinent aspects of control matrices.

9. Multiple analytes, metabolites and mayhem   – In this instalment of Robert MacNeill’s column, Robert discusses the perils and pitfalls of cramming as many analytes as possible, particularly metabolites, into a regulated bioanalytical LC-MS method.

10. Balancing instability precautions against risk of adsorptive losses – In this instalment, Robert discusses the instability of drugs within samples and how to balance their instability against absorptive loss.

11. Cranking up the plate count – the most obvious way – In this instalment, Robert discusses how to increase column plate count.

12. Why small lipids can seem more daunting than many biologics – In this instalment, Robert discusses methodologies for small lipids, and why these can be a particularly challenging area of biologics.

13. QC samples and internal standard nominal concentration placement – In this instalment, Robert discusses where to best place specific QC samples within a calibration range for a methodology, and the challenges associated with establishing suitable nominal levels for the internal standard concentration.

14. The distinct bioanalytical paradigms for solutions and for extracts – In this instalment, Robert discusses the potential disparity in results when using a given method for extracted analytical batches versus in solution, the different challenges involved with solutions and extracts and the necessity to fully consider the relevant chemistry from the earliest stages of method development.

15. The biomarker bandwagon’s journey over curious calibration curves – In this instalment, Robert explores the potential information to be gleaned from calibration curves and how these insights could possibly fuel innovation in the field of biomarker quantification.

16. Heroics of HILIC in tempestuous times – In this instalment of Robert explores hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and how the technique is often overlooked.

17. Ahead of the curve

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